(Source: lukenewtberry, via fightlikemenintights)

compromisedanalintegrity:

thespiritfox:

We lost Earl Ragnar, our favorite Beta fish. 

& we were sure to give him a viking’s funeral as such a magnificent fish as he deserves. 

See you in Valhalla my friend. 

Sail, Ragnar. Sail. 

you set your little girl’s dead fish on fire in front of her eyes this is incredible

(via fightlikemenintights)

(Source: cactuslands, via pinnacle-strength)

wordsnquotes:

BOOK OF THE DAY: 
The Book Thief by Markus Zusak
Markus Zusak’s risk paid off in The Book Thief when he made Death its narrator. The story is set in Nazi Germany during World War II. Death recounts the story of an orphan, a nine-year-old girl named, Liesel. Death has in possession a book she wrote about the years of her life from 1939-1943 and the destruction and sadness she left behind, such as her home.  Liesel still able to find the small pleasures in life steals a few books.
Although Liesel has been torn from a life with her parents she finds a good home with her foster Hans and Rosa Hubermann. Hans teaches Liesel how to read and write, while Rosa is known to swear a lot and have a good heart. One night, Max Vandenburg, a Jewish man, visits the Hubermann house. Max is the son of a dear friend who saved Hans’s life  during World War I. He made this friend a promise to help his widowed wife. Hans does not hate Jews and hides Max is in his basement. Max and Lisel become friends. The novel revolves around the growing relationship between Liesel and the two men. 
Books have become Liesel’s main pleasure. She is a child living in a time of war, where depression, death and deprival reign, which is why books are magic to her. 
Zuzak is a poet of the written word, although Liesel lives in Nazi Germany and Death is the narrator, he never depicts a morbid story. Death is a lonely and tortured entity who is drawn to children. It has had years to examine and observe human nature. Zuzak writes:

"So many humans. So many colours. They keep triggering inside me. They harass my memory. I see them tall in their heaps, all mounted on top of each other. There is air like plastic, a horizon like setting glue. There are skies manufactured by people, punctured and leaking, and there are soft, coal-coloured clouds, beating, like black hearts. And then. There is death. Making his way through all of it. On the surface: unflappable, unwavering. Below: unnerved, untied, and undone."
"People and Jews and clouds all stopped. They watched. As he stood, Max looked first at the girl and then stared directly into the sky who was wide and blue and magnificent. There were heavy beams - planks of sun - falling randomly, wonderfully, onto the road. Clouds arched their backs to look behind as they started again to move on. "It’s such a beautiful day," he said, and his voice was in many pieces. A great day to die. A great day to die, like this."

Zuzak authentically measures human nature by presenting two sides of Germany: committed Nazis and people like Hans.  Only Zuzak could have pulled this off. There is nothing mournful about the story. His writing and plot seamlessly find each other into a hauntingly beautiful piece of literature. It is difficult to talk talk about the plot without recognizing Zuzak’s true artistry. 
Zuzak has revealed that the book was inspired by two real-life events connected to his German parents. One is the bombing of Munich, and the other: a story of a teenage boy who offered his bread to an emancipated Jewish prisoner. Both the boy and the prisoner were whipped by a soldier. Nevertheless, the nature of Zuzak’s believable character and life in Nazi Germany make the novel extraordinarily unique. When you consider this as the inspiration of the novel, you fully comprehend and appreciate Zuzak’s portrayal of life in Germany. 
Death is Zuzak’s most powerful tool. The portrayal of such a believable young girl and the relationships form between people sweep you off your feet. His language demands attention. Every image of loss, friendship, and war reverberate your soul. The Book Thief is worth a first and second read. The supporting characters and the overall language will make this an instant favorite in your library. 
Read excerpts from the book here! Get the book here!
Facebook  | Instagram |  Twitter |  Pinterest  |  Society6

wordsnquotes:

BOOK OF THE DAY: 

The Book Thief by Markus Zusak

Markus Zusak’s risk paid off in The Book Thief when he made Death its narrator. The story is set in Nazi Germany during World War II. Death recounts the story of an orphan, a nine-year-old girl named, Liesel. Death has in possession a book she wrote about the years of her life from 1939-1943 and the destruction and sadness she left behind, such as her home.  Liesel still able to find the small pleasures in life steals a few books.

Although Liesel has been torn from a life with her parents she finds a good home with her foster Hans and Rosa Hubermann. Hans teaches Liesel how to read and write, while Rosa is known to swear a lot and have a good heart. One night, Max Vandenburg, a Jewish man, visits the Hubermann house. Max is the son of a dear friend who saved Hans’s life  during World War I. He made this friend a promise to help his widowed wife. Hans does not hate Jews and hides Max is in his basement. Max and Lisel become friends. The novel revolves around the growing relationship between Liesel and the two men. 

Books have become Liesel’s main pleasure. She is a child living in a time of war, where depression, death and deprival reign, which is why books are magic to her. 

Zuzak is a poet of the written word, although Liesel lives in Nazi Germany and Death is the narrator, he never depicts a morbid story. Death is a lonely and tortured entity who is drawn to children. It has had years to examine and observe human nature. Zuzak writes:

"So many humans. So many colours. They keep triggering inside me. They harass my memory. I see them tall in their heaps, all mounted on top of each other. There is air like plastic, a horizon like setting glue. There are skies manufactured by people, punctured and leaking, and there are soft, coal-coloured clouds, beating, like black hearts. And then. There is death. Making his way through all of it. On the surface: unflappable, unwavering. Below: unnerved, untied, and undone."

"People and Jews and clouds all stopped. They watched. As he stood, Max looked first at the girl and then stared directly into the sky who was wide and blue and magnificent. There were heavy beams - planks of sun - falling randomly, wonderfully, onto the road. Clouds arched their backs to look behind as they started again to move on. "It’s such a beautiful day," he said, and his voice was in many pieces. A great day to die. A great day to die, like this."

Zuzak authentically measures human nature by presenting two sides of Germany: committed Nazis and people like Hans.  Only Zuzak could have pulled this off. There is nothing mournful about the story. His writing and plot seamlessly find each other into a hauntingly beautiful piece of literature. It is difficult to talk talk about the plot without recognizing Zuzak’s true artistry. 

Zuzak has revealed that the book was inspired by two real-life events connected to his German parents. One is the bombing of Munich, and the other: a story of a teenage boy who offered his bread to an emancipated Jewish prisoner. Both the boy and the prisoner were whipped by a soldier. Nevertheless, the nature of Zuzak’s believable character and life in Nazi Germany make the novel extraordinarily unique. When you consider this as the inspiration of the novel, you fully comprehend and appreciate Zuzak’s portrayal of life in Germany. 

Death is Zuzak’s most powerful tool. The portrayal of such a believable young girl and the relationships form between people sweep you off your feet. His language demands attention. Every image of loss, friendship, and war reverberate your soul. The Book Thief is worth a first and second read. The supporting characters and the overall language will make this an instant favorite in your library. 

Read excerpts from the book here! Get the book here!

Facebook  | Instagram |  Twitter |  Pinterest  |  Society6

comedycentral:

Click here for more of Jon Stewart’s coverage of the recent House Committee on Science, Space and Technology hearing.

(via fightlikemenintights)

"It is not a lack of love, but a lack of friendship that makes unhappy marriages."

Friedrich Nietzsche (via hqlines)

"One is never afraid of the unknown; one is afraid of the known coming to an end."

Jiddu Krishnamurti (via sophianism)

(via hyperbolequeen)

"I tried to love you less. I couldn’t."

 Simone de Beauvoir, from The Mandarins (via violentwavesofemotion)

(via hyperbolequeen)

(Source: uniqueshomedesign, via polkadotsandprep)

"He may love you, he may miss you, but ultimately he’s just not that into you."

Greg Behrendt (via hqlines)

Harry Potter meme: Nine characters 

→ [2/9] Dean Thomas

(via keepingupwiththekardacheyennes)

surprisebitch:

image

yes, that is britney spears, (who has sold more than 200 Million records, has six #1 albums, 2 diamond albums, has more than 400 awards, and is worth 200 million dollars) waiting in line to be served at starbucks wearing pyjamas

(via trust)

crouchingtigerhiddendragqueen:

:-)

crouchingtigerhiddendragqueen:

:-)

(via afternoonsnoozebutton)

"How weird it is to think I used to not know of your existence. I somehow lived my life without ever knowing you were a person. Once we met though, god I haven’t been able to get you out of my head since. It’s hard to imagine I used to be able to live my life without you consuming my head with thoughts."

kmr (disastrous-heartache)

(Source: seventeenandinsatiable, via pinnacle-strength)